3-ways-to-improve-your-images-with-composition


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Please click on the link below to read this highly recommended article by us.

http://digital-photography-school.com/3-ways-to-improve-your-images-with-composition/

shared by www.stockimagebank.com  June 2014 for non commercial use.

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Your imagination will set you apart by Udita Singh


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They say “an image is worth a 1000 words”. I couldn’t agree more. I recently saw an image that pierced me in places I didn’t know existed. It was a picture of a frail old man, a panhandler, standing with a stick for support in one hand and a begging bowl in the other. His head hung extremely low and the people around him in the photograph just seem to walk on past him. Was he invisible to them? My heart just broke.

I wondered. What really is the purpose of this image or images in general?

It is my belief that the purpose of an image then is to be evocative, to haunt you with the unspoken, to alter your state of mind for a brief moment, to transport you to places, to make you wonder, to give you a glimpse of someone else’s life, to capture a fleeting moment, to inspire, to tell a story … the list is endless. Whether you are a hobbyist or a professional photographer, each capture is a once in a lifetime event.

But then how does one distinguish good photography from bad? Coming back to the old man narrative in the preceding section, what I didn’t mention then was the fact that this image was black and white. It was dramatic; it had an arresting center of interest (the subject), the lighting albeit natural – set the right mood and had a strong impact. If the same image was in colour, I believe it would have lost almost all those qualities.

There are certain key elements in good photography in any genre of the art form whether it is stock photography, street photography, nature photography, so on and so forth.

1.      Timing and Composition – Perfectly timed images make for perfect images.

2.      Lighting – It sets a striking mood. And your image will be striking when it’s used effectively. Do not be afraid to experiment with natural lighting.

3.      Editing and publishing – Be selective in choosing your images and pick few to publish. There is sense and satisfaction in exclusivity.

4.      Effects – The right effects can achieve and say a lot about your image.

5.      Consistency – Maintaining the same feel and movement in your body of work, especially individual projects.

6.      Steering away from the obvious – No one wants to see clichéd pictures of sunsets and tourist attractions! Step out of your comfort zone and challenge yourself to see what no one else does! Do not overlook tiny details.

One can write endlessly about the zillion technicalities involved in image making but to me “the” most important element in good photography is that individual’s vision behind the camera lens.

All you really need is your imagination and curiosity to set you apart from the crowd. How far are you willing to go to tell your soul stirring story?

Article Credit : Udita Singh                                                                                      Udita is a dreamer. She works in the creative department at  http://www.StockImageBank.com. A cheerful, bright spot that she is, she is very observant. This ability has created a very honest expression of her point of view on images and photography. We though it was worth sharing with all of you ! Hope it changes the way you look at the image.

Dear Photographers, Your Creation is your livelihood !


Dear Photographers worldwide,
How may of you are aware of your rights ? How many of you actually take the initiative to make friends and family around you aware that plagiarism of images is a crime. Lifting images from google, flicker & elsewhere on the net and using for commercial endeavours is inappropriate. That the creator of that image at the end of the tunnel, is someone like yourself who has invested in equipment, has spent time and energy with a lot of passion to create something that they “Love”, love enough to use commercially !!
There are a lot of more important issues I understand, but unless each one of you make it you personal mandate to speak about it and educate plagiarism will continue.

WP MAy 2013
Educated professionals from advertising such as visualizers, art directors, creative directors, marketing heads, branding and communication professionals , editors, magazine owners, press, media, business owners  … Lets all work towards sensitising the world around us.

Piracy of images is a crime !! Period. Unite and address this.

I would urge you to share this. Creation of images is a livelihood for photographers everywhere. Only if we join hands and create awareness in each of our circles will this be viewed as unethical. Its a chain.

Images will always be a part of communication. If we want to continue creating good work that enables business to generate revenue ( directly or indirectly ) we should all come together. We at StockImageBank.com are always available to assist anyone who needs guidance to know know more. Please feel free to write to me directly or make it a discussion in open forums !!

Till then Happy Shooting ! !

– Sugandha Dubey, is the founder of http://www.stockimagebank.com, one of India’s Premier Stock Photo Agency.

Five Tips for Shooting Stock Images


OK, so you have been involved in nature photography seriously for the last few years, and you have started to accumulate a number of quality images. Maybe it is time to seek an agency, or perhaps you would rather self-market your images. In either case, the leap to “stock images” represents a paradigm shift that will require you to totally rethink your approach to photography. Rather than debate the advantages and disadvantages of various types of agencies, this article covers five specific tips for photographers that market their images or are contemplating doing so.

  1. by Bill HornDon’t always shoot for yourself- diversify. 
    It is no longer just about you and what you enjoy shooting. If your intent is to sell images, and you specialize in butterflies or birds only, your market will be restricted to that customer base alone. Expanding your horizon photographically will not only increase sales potential, but it will make you a better, more diverse photographer as well. Embrace each photographic event as an opportunity to expand your portfolio. I once went to SE Oklahoma for a weekend photographing birds. On the way back, a radio communications tower caught my eye, so I stopped and took a few shots. None of the bird images I got that weekend have sold, but the image of the radio tower has sold more than once. There is nothing unique or special about the image; it just happened to catch the editor’s eye on a given day. Not every image you take has to be a nature image.
  2. Vary composition and technique. 
    Editors and publishers are a finicky lot. I learned long ago that it is pointless to try and second guess them. It is better to offer them choices. Let’s say you encounter a butterfly on a nice, clean perch. Make sure your first shot is with him centered and lots of room on all sides – you have no idea how the editor will want to crop the final image. Then, take more shots from different angles, varying lighting conditions, background, and other elements of the image. It is all about choices. Case in point: Note the Red-bellied Woodpecker image. If I posted that image in the avian forum at PM, it would get numerous negative responses such as chopped bird, too much space on the left, etc. But imagine it as a two page spread in a magazine with lead-in text on the left, and you can then see the potential as a stock image.
  3. Maintain technical perfection. 
    Stock agencies want you to submit massive quantities of images; and indeed your goal should be to have thousands of images on file eventually. But, don’t sacrifice quality for the sake of quantity. Each image you create represents you as a photographer. Submit only images that are technically perfect. Prior to submitting, pull each image file into your image editor and zoom to 100%. Scroll over the image and get rid of all dust spots. If the image won’t hold detail at 100%, do not submit it. Be your own worst critic. The client deserves a high quality image; anything less can damage your reputation.
  4. >by Bill HornThink like an editor. 
    While it may be impossible to anticipate the specific desire of any given editor, publisher or client, there are a few things you can do to get a leg up on the competition. Put yourself in their shoes; try to think as they would. How do you do that? Pay attention trends and to what is being published. If you are marketing to a specific entity, such as a local magazine, look at back issues. Try and get a feel for the type images they like. Clients want to sell their products, period! Look closely at images in magazines, and you will often see images that at first appear somewhat mundane. In these type images 70-80% of the image will be drab or out of focus, and your eye is automatically drawn to the 10% of the image they want you to see – that is their commercial intent. As nature photographers, we strive to keep elements of the hand of man (HOM) out of our images. For stock photography, the EXACT OPPOSITE applies. People like seeing people in images, doing things, interacting with nature. So, spend more time thinking like an editor, rather than a photographer when making your images.
  5. Marketing 101. 
    Even if you decide to go with an agency, you still must market yourself. Agency sales will represent only a portion of your sales; the rest is up to you. This is the toughest issue for most photographers; they do not know how to go about marketing their own work. First: be organized and prepared. You photograph a Purple Martin today, and three years later a client asks if you have any Purple Martin images. Will you remember? Maybe, maybe not. Keyword your images and employ any one of the commercial databases available to photographers. Perhaps your goal is to get published in your state’s outdoor magazine. I will offer three ways you could go approach the task: 1). Burn 200 of your best images onto CD-ROM and mail it to the editor. The CD will likely be trashed and never viewed, as the editor does not know you personally. 2.) Create a quality Kinko’s type photo album using the same 200 images, and mail that to the editor. Chances are increased slightly, but when and why will they need your particular images? 3.) Write a 1500 word article relevant to subjects the magazine would cover. Personally deliver the article and album to the editor and introduce yourself in a professional manner. You increased your chances tenfold by cutting his workload. He can publish your article and images will little effort on his part – editors are lazy and love for us to do all the work!

by Bill Horn by Bill Horn

Credit : http://www.photomigrations.com/articles/0706100.htm

We acame across this article by Bill Horn. It made perfect sense to share it with our readers. We hope you benefit from this information and it helps you in creating images that will fetch you revenues.

Shared by : http://www.stockimagebank.com

“The Switch Background Innovation”


Friends, I am extremely pleased to share with you the “The Switch Background Innovation”

Its been a dilemma ever since we started out in 2008. We chose dark background for Version 1 of http://www.stockimagebank.com. We loved it, but we also loved white.

So then started a feedback survey, and each time we spoke to our clients we asked them if they preferred a dark or a white site background when looking for images. At the end of 2 years we were at the same spot where we started and realised that the votes were divided in a 50: 50 split !

We realised it was subjective and a matter of choice. So we decided to bring in “Freedom to choose” for all our buyers. We have been working very hard and are finally out with the Version 2 of our site.
We created a Switch Background Option to the entire site ! !

http://www.stockimagebank.com/index.aspx

The first to do so for a stock image site in the world are extremely proud !

Its just been a week and we have got a tremendous response so far from the industry.
There are a few tweaks and minor issues that we are aligning with the previous database and site with, but I would love to get a response from my friends here !

Its a labour of Love, and I’d be really grateful if you could visit the site, register so that I get to know that you visited, and share your thoughts here or write to me privately at sugandha@stockimagebank.com.

Look forward to your feedback and thank you for sparing the time.
Sugandha

7 things to keep in mind before you choose a brand ambassador for your product


Hrithik Roshan( Indian Film actor) was recently unveiled as the brand ambassador for cliquish Swiss watch brand, Rado. According to press kits handed out at the event, the actor mirrors the brand’s mastery of breaking new ground and its uncompromising commitment to excellence. But, in a country so brainwashed with images of Shah Rukh Khan (Indian Film actor) and a Tag Heuer is there really room for another superstar and his extravagant time-piece? While I’m sure every-one wishes Hrithik three thumbs up in his new endeavour, finding the right celebrity to suit a brand’s image or personality is not as simple as pitting Amitabh Bachan (Indian Film actor)with any product you find on the shelf.

Here are a few points to remember when choosing a brand ambassador.

1. Brands themselves have a personality. The key is to choose a good brand ambassador whose personality matches that of the brand. He or she must have strong identities that correspond with the product/service. For example George Clooney’s five year association with Omega is probably the most ideal endorsement. He’s sophisticated in his manner, classic in his appearance and refined in his action, much like an envisioned Omega wearer.

2. Choosing a brand ambassador creates an association in the mind of the customer between that person and the brand. So don’t let just anybody be associated with your brand. Luxury auto manufacture, Bentley was quick to squash any rumours of contractual association between Paris Hilton and the brand when she painted her new Continental GT, bright pink.

3. The brand ambassador must be somebody who embodies the core values and characteristics of the brand. For example, Lance Armstrong’s association with Livestrong and Nike is a well crafted relationship. Inspirational to some, motivational to others, Livestrong was a brand forged around Lance Armstrong’s personality, on his road to recovery.

4. Your choice of ambassador must be rooted in the personality of your target market and of the brand you are trying to market. Virat Kohli’s association with Fasttrack is the perfect match. As a brand, the young and upcoming cricketer appeals to the exact same genre, to which the uber trendy accessories-manufacturer does.

5. A brand ambassador should be somebody the customer looks up to or aspires to emulate. The image of the brand ambassador should elicit a favourable response in the mind of the target audience. Icon, Sachin Tendulkar’s association with Adidas is a rock solid partnership that has been going steady for many years. People want to be like him and Adidas never fails to support their dream.

6. Decide what image you want your brand to portray and associate that with a personality that reflects that. Thumbs Up decided to take a more adrenaline filled path, in promoting their beverage. Akshay Kumar is the ideal, Indian adrenaline junkie.

7. You aren’t just selling a product; you’re selling a lifestyle. If consumers buy your product they will be closer to attaining the life they seek. There are many who believe that through Michael Phelps’ association with Subway, eating a healthy sandwich can lead to Olympic fitness.

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Written By Suhail Bhandari for Image Management.

Shared by www.stockimagebank.com for non commercial reasons. Just a good read  and POV.