ALWAYS BE SQUINCHING AND OTHER TRICKS FROM A PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHER FOR TAKING FLATTERING PICTURES


TRICKS FROM A PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHER

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Please click on the link below to read this highly recommended article by us.

http://digital-photography-school.com/3-ways-to-improve-your-images-with-composition/

shared by www.stockimagebank.com  June 2014 for non commercial use.

Royalty Free (RF) – What is it ?


Royalty Free (RF)
“Free” in this context means “free of royalties (paying each time you use an image)”. It does not mean the image is free to use without purchasing a license or that the image is in the public domain.

  • Pay a one-time fee to use the image multiple times for multiple purposes (with limits).
  • No time limit on when the buyer can use an image.
  • No one can have exclusive rights of a Royalty-free image (the photographer can sell the image as many times as he or she wants).
  • A Royalty-free image usually has a limit to how many times the buyer can reproduce it. For example, a license might allow the buyer to print 500,000 brochures with the purchased image. The amount of copies made is called the print run. The buyer is required to pay a fee per brochure, usually 1 to 3 cents, for additional prints. Magazines with a large print run cannot use a standard Royalty-free license and therefore they either purchase images with a Rights-managed license or have in-house photographers.

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Branding – Quote of the week


April 2014 infographics SIBSA

From the collection of over 3 million Indian & International Stock Images, we will share inspiring Quotes in this section.
Please feel free to share if it strikes a cord with you !
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3 Tips to make your image more commercially viable !


At StockImageBank.com India, we are constantly asking ourselves. ” What would this picture be used for? and again, more importantly,Will this image make money? The answer lies in the conceptual value of the image and its ability to be used by different clients multiple times for multiple purpose. An image of a dockyard even if it has property release may have limited use.

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However, an image of adventure sport ( rock climbing/ para sailing/ bungee jumping .. ) could be used many more times. Reasons ? More conceptual depicting growth, courage, future, direction, independence, fitness, Getting the wiff ?

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Some tips to maximise your shots !

Tip No. 1.
75% of the images selected by our clients are SMILING.
 There is always a place for serious expressions, but those that have concern or gestures that communicate seriousness.

Tip No. 2                                                                                                               Play with different kinds of lighting . Though clean flat lighting is ok for cutouts interesting lighting always engages a creative person and attracts selection.

Tip No. 3.                                                                                                                     Stretch your concepts creatively : you must ask yourself, After doing the base shots, how can I add value by adding others elements? objects like pencils, newspaper, coins, currency, small plants, locks, watches, clocks, flags. How can you add and Indian contemporary flavour to it ? 

Photography is an art and commercial photography is the art of creating images that make brands make money. India is still evolving when it comes to commercial stock photography. I will keep posting my insights to help those who want to explore and monetize their works.

Posted by Sugandha Dubey

SIBSA Ad of the day – Flipkart


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The ad is just one depiction of the fabulous series of ads developed by team of Happy Creative ( http://www.thinkhappy.biz/ ).Founded by Kartik Iyer and Praveen Das in May 2007, Happy Creative Services India Pvt Ltd is an Idea Shop, as they call themselves.

I ordered my first book ” Rework” 2 days back via Flipkart. I must compliment the company and its team for the fabulous experience ! You live up to the creative and the promise that it makes 🙂  I am hooked to Flipkart ! – Sugandha Dubey

 

10 Tips for Shooting Stock Photos That Make Art Directors Happy


The stigma of using stock is pretty much a thing of the past, and maybe you’ve decided shooting for any number of stock houses is something you’re going to try.

Now, none of these are absolutes — rules set in stone being the last thing a creative wants — but having a general idea of the types of things we look for may help your work sell better.

Some of these suggestions may overlap, and others may be relevant depending upon your situation. A lot also has to do with the agency, and what categories they work on. So in no particular order, here are my 10 recommendations:

1. Shoot what you know.

If you shoot great landscapes, why all of a sudden try medical research and high tech just because it’s popular? Go ahead if you want, but understand that there’s a lot of competition out there already, so your shots of lasers better really stand out. If you do want to try a category you may not have tried before, look at existing collateral in that category in the form of brochures, Web sites, posters, point-of-sale materials, etc. This will help familiarize you with current styles and trends.

2. Know your category.

This goes hand in hand with the first one. When you really understand a category (teens, automotive, cuisine, etc.), chances are you’ll be able to dig a little deeper and come up with shots and angles nobody else can see, especially if you live that category.

3. Don’t shoot just what’s popular.

Sounds contradictory to the mission at hand, which is to shoot stuff that sells. What it means, though, is don’t give me the same thing I can get from 100 other photographers, especially if you know that category like the back of your hand. That’s even more reason to push yourself.

4. Bore me.

Okay, another contradiction. Let’s say you’re shooting hands. Give me a wide range of realistic but natural positions, nothing elaborate. Simple, relaxed hands holding a coffee cup, on the phone, tapping a desk, etc. And close-up too. Please shoot close on a few shots. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve found the perfect position for a hand that was part of a larger shot, but when I went to enlarge it, the hand is grainy or not really in focus.

5. Don’t bore me.

So you covered the boring shot of the engine block. Now, give me an extreme close-up and dramatic POV shot. Maybe shoot all macro B&W. It’s here where if you are shooting a category you know that I want you to really push things and explore.

6. Keep it simple.

Don’t clutter up a shot. I personally respond to things that are clean; leave an area around the subject, too. For example, for a shot of someone walking on the beach, normally you see various poses of someone shot full-figure at water’s edge but without enough sky in the pic or “space” on either side of them. I don’t mean become like David Lean and shoot everything long and epic with man as but a tiny speck in a vast landscape — just don’t always crop nature out of a scene so much. Yes, that’s what Photoshop is for, but why not save the studio some retouching time?

7. Easy on the themes.

This one goes with the last one and is subjective. Now, I can’t make you stop shooting whatever weird fantasy you have going on in your head, but when I see a CD collection on Photodisc with extreme characters, bizarre props and really outlandish color schemes, you’ve pretty much guaranteed that I’ll take a pass. Why? Because the 50 Elvis impersonators standing in a field at night with lit sparklers is just too specific a theme for me to ever use. I’d have to be looking for that from the start, and what are the odds we’d need something like that unless the piece called for it? Very low indeed.

However, this is not the same thing as shooting retro motels, diners or cars, or even a range of someone’s emotions. Say you have a particular lighting style and you’re shooting a series of laundromats. Just keep the scenes simple. Places like that already have enough character without a ballerina on a dryer.

We also don’t need you to do anything “extra” with a funky old Chevy; it’s cool as is, trust us. We want shots simple because, well, we’re going to do something with them ourselves more than likely and we just don’t need anything else messing with that. So get Elvis out of the car, please.

8. Include the entire subject in a shot.

Related to “Keep it simple,” but shoot a range of shots in terms of both angle and proximity. Just like the movies, we like the same type of coverage: wide, medium and close-up shots — all of it.

If you want to focus on the corner of a cool sign outside some Route 66 motel, fine. (Just like we dig old cars, we also like anything retro — like signs.) But back up and make sure you get a shot of the entire sign with plenty of background around it. There’s nothing like finding the perfect shot, only to see part of it missing.

And when you get the entire sign in the shot, please also remember to shoot a straight-on angle of it and not just a low POV off-center that might distort things.

9. Avoid cliches.

Like, businessmen in suits with briefcases running against each other around a track. Let me guess: the rat race?

10. Keep it real.

Have your talent save the bad acting for soap operas. Honest, genuine expressions, please. Real moments where you catch people with their guards down are far more appealing than the shiny happy people R.E.M. sang about. Speaking of bands, find a real band — there are plenty of up-and-coming bands — and shoot them in a real club. Avoid the model who doesn’t know how to even hold the guitar and waves her arm wildly like Pete Townshend.

Article credit : Bill Green

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Please feel free to contact us at www.stockimagebank.com for any photography related questions / image creation / photography solutions / still photoshoot / lessons etc. 

You can write to us at contact@stockimagebank.com

Advertising and Stock Photography go hand in hand


Why Use Photography In Advertising and how stock images is serious work !

The Major Purpose of Advertising is to arouse the consumers desire to own any given product. Advertising photography is used to stimulate these desires to an act and purchase. The advertising photographer must illustrate, explain, excite, and help create this desire for any given advertised product. The consumer and/or reader will be exposed to these images in a varied media formats: magazines, newspapers, television, billboards and now even the Internet.

Today’s advertising photographer must go beyond being just a camera technician. There is not a single professional photographer in this field who has not spent long hours and hard work in perfecting his or her technique, both in handling the camera and in the quality of the finished product, the photograph. To command the respect of his clients, and to have his or her work consistently in demand, the advertising photographer must have, in addition to this technical ability, creative vision, imagination, and an ability to capture unique descriptive images on film.

It’s A Team Effort

An advertising photographer rarely works alone, for their talents must synchronize with those of the other part of the team, the art director. Together they must communicate ideas and work together on the final ‘look’ or ‘feeling’ of the illustration. The art director, however, works on other aspects of the advertisement such as the copy, the over-all layout, typography, and the space and media in which the final ad will be placed and seen. The photographer, therefore, must work in harmony with the total plans of the art director, who is responsible for the complete visual appearance of the advertisement.

Every serious photographer who is thinking of entering the advertising field should understand what is involved. The advertising agency, in handling an account, has invested time and money before any project is assigned to the photographer. There have been copy meetings, media conferences, idea discussions, which result in the accepted layout given to the photographer.

Working From Layouts

As a cartoonist makes rough sketches, the art director makes rough visuals or layouts. The art director gets their creative cues from the copy department, account executive or even the advertising client. These cues tell the art director what the ad headline or slogan will be and what the final ‘look’ or ‘feeling’ should be. It is the art director’s job to present the idea visually, usually through rough sketches, to the other members of advertising team. These rough drawings, the layoutsare sent along, sometimes with alternate ideas, to the assigned photographer. The sketches are meant to guide the photographer in the photographic interpretation of the basic idea.

Crude and rough as these visuals often are, the experienced and discerning photographer respects them, works from them, and transforms them into pictures with eye-catching impact. Not all art directors use visual layouts some will direct the photographer without the help of any sketches. Each has his or her own favorite method of working, but every art director works toward one common end: the creation of an ad that will have sales appeal. Every art director assigns a participle photographer to a participle assignment because they feel that the selected photographer will contribute their own unique talent in creating a photographic image. They also assume that the photographer will respect the confidential information with regards to the assignment. To show, repeat, or quote any part of an advertising campaign is an unforgivable breach of professional ethics.

Source Unknown ( if you know the original writer of this please inform we will give due credit )

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Stock Photography Tips: Lifestyle Shots


Have you ever noticed when reading a magazine or flicking through a brochure, how many of the images are ‘lifestyle’ images? Photographs of people doing things, talking to each other, sitting in the gardens, exercising, eating and reading together etc. These kinds of photographs may seem contrived and a bit corny, but they have an important use in stock photography because they add something to the story.

For example, if a magazine is writing about exercising, they can search the stock libraries and find an image of someone of which their demographic can relate to doing some exercise. If it’s a specific kind of exercise, say yoga, it can be an image of that to demonstrate what it looks like.

Same goes for cooperate companies that look for images of people in suits or apparently in business meetings. It’s a good way to convey a professional image or to show what kind of team your company has (young, mature, professional work environment, relaxed) etc.

The benefit for companies is that it’s much cheaper to buy a stock image than it is to commission your own photographs. You get photogenic people and clean, well composed shots.

So if you are thinking of taking lifestyle shots to sell on a stock library what kind of things should you start with?

Well firstly think about the kind of images that people will want to buy – if you can make things a little specific, that’s great too because its more likely to be picked out by people who are working within a niche.

Some ideas include:

1. Healthy Living shots.

These are very popular since internationally, the issue of health, obesity and weight loss is a constant news source. So think about shots of people doing exercise – it could be jogging, weights, yoga, stretches. It could be something with a water bottle; it could be someone in gym wear. It could even be something eating healthy food like salads, or eating something unhealthier like a large burger. Imagine what kind of story that could work for – perhaps a piece of how people are struggling with healthy eating?

Remember when you do these kinds of shots, it’s not actually about getting your model jumping around getting red and sweaty – pose them as you would at a fashion shot, making sure they look polished and there’s no motion blur.

2. Couples

Couples lifestyle shots work well because there are always features and articles concerning marriage, dating and love. In this case you don’t need to actually find a couple, and of course since there are many pieces written on same gender relationships you can even get two people of the same sex together.

In these cases you need to consider a few things – are your models happy with the context of the shot and aware that if someone buys it they can use it for all kinds of uses and articles? Are they happy to pose as a couple with the other person? A professional model understands the score, but if you are borrowing a friend then you need to let them know.

Then look at the couple – do they fit. Be honest here – is one person a lot younger looking than the other?

You can do shots of them together, looking happy but lover’s tiff or argument images also work well – for example a couple together and the woman folding her arms to express annoyance. These work well with women’s magazine articles.

credit : proud photography

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